Tuesday, 23 December 2014

Tooth Abscess Symptoms And Treatment

Symptoms And Treatment Of Tooth Abscess
If you have a toothache that goes beyond mild to moderate tooth pain and reaches a level of severe, throbbing pain, it could be a sign of a tooth abscess. A tooth abscess is a pus-filled lesion at the roots of a tooth, and is caused by an infection. The first sign is a throbbing toothache that won’t go away.

At first, the tooth will likely be sensitive to chewing and biting, as well as to heat and cold. You also may develop a fever, swollen lymph nodes in your jaw or neck, or swelling on your face.

If the abscess ruptures, you’ll know because of the nasty-tasting discharge in your mouth. Although the pain may recede if the abscess ruptures, you still need to be treated by a dentist in order to get rid of the infection, save the tooth and avoid complications. If the abscess doesn’t rupture, the infection can spread to other parts of the body. This is not a problem to ignore.

Treatment will likely include draining the abscess if it hasn’t ruptured. Your dentist also may recommend that you take over-the-counter pain relievers, rinse your mouth with warm salt water, and take antibiotics. More severe abscesses may require a root canal to remove infected tissue, and the worst cases require extraction of the tooth.

A tooth abscess can get its start as an untreated tooth cavity, so the best way to prevent an abscess is to prevent the cavity in the first place by following a consistent oral health routine of twice daily tooth brushing and daily flossing. Regular visits to your dentist are important too, especially if you’ve been treated for an abscess. This allows your dentist to confirm that the infection has cleared.

The above article is from: OralB.com

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Saturday, 20 December 2014

Pregnancy & Oral Health

Learn more about the risks to your oral health during pregnancy.



The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry

7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Tuesday, 16 December 2014

Causes and Treatment of Canker Sores

Cold Sores and Canker Sores Compared
It’s easy to confuse cold sores and canker sores.

Unlike a cold sore, a canker sore is not contagious, and it appears on the inside tissues of the mouth rather than the outer surface of the lip (which is where cold sores appear). A canker sore, also known as an apthous ulcer, looks like a small, round or oval lesion that has a white or yellowish center surrounded by red. They tend to be indented, like a crater, rather than raised, like a bump.

Canker sores most often appear on the inside of the cheeks and lips or at the base of the gum. Canker sores are not usually associated with bleeding gums, so if you are experiencing bleeding gums you should see your dentist to be evaluated for possible gum disease.

The majority of canker sores are mild. Mild canker sores are less than one-third of an inch long and usually heal on their own after a few weeks.

But major apthous ulcers, defined as larger than 10 mm in size, can take more than a month to heal and can cause scarring when they finally do heal. So it’s important to visit your doctor or dentist if you have a canker sore that has persisted for more than a few weeks. These large ulcers are most common in young adults after puberty, and they are more likely to recur than smaller sores. Older adults are more prone to herpetiform lesions, in which dozens of tiny lesions group together to form a large ulcer.

The exact cause of canker sores remains uncertain, but possible factors include an allergic reaction to bacteria in the mouth, a minor injury to the inside of the mouth due to dental work or poorly fitting dental appliances, food allergies or health problems, such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases.

Although most canker sores resolve on their own, if you have a large or stubborn lesion, your dentist may prescribe an antibiotic mouth rinse, topical paste to apply to the lesion, or a nutritional supplement if poor nutrition may be the cause of the canker sore.

The above article is from: OralB.com

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry

7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Saturday, 13 December 2014

Tuesday, 9 December 2014

What To Know About TMJ

What Are TMJ Diseases And Disorders? 
TMJ diseases and disorders are a group of conditions that cause pain in and around the jaw joint (called the Temporomandibular Joint or TMJ) and nearby muscles. Jaw problems affect a person's ability to speak, eat, chew, swallow and even breathe.

What Are Symptoms Of TMJ?
Pain is the most common symptom of TMJ; however, some people have no pain but still have problems using their jaws. Specific symptoms include:
Face pain
Pain in the jaw joint and nearby areas, including the ear
Back pain
Inability to open the mouth comfortably
Clicking, popping or grating sounds in the jaw joint
Locking of the jaw when attempting to open the mouth
Headaches
A bite that is uncomfortable or feels “off”
Swelling on the side of the face, neck or shoulder

Other symptoms may include ringing in the ears, decreased hearing, dizziness and vision problems.

Keep in mind that occasional discomfort in the jaw joint or chewing muscles is common and is not a cause for concern. Many people with TMJ problems get better without treatment. Often the problem goes away on its own in several weeks to months.

To read the entire article please visit: OralB.com

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry

7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Saturday, 6 December 2014

Bad Breath (also known as Halitosis)

Learn more about Bad Breath, which is also known as Halitosis.



The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry

7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048