Sunday, 31 March 2013

The Parts of a Tooth


A tooth is basically made up of two parts: the crown and the root.

The crown is what you see when you smile or open your mouth. It's the part that sits above your gumline.

The root is below the gumline. It makes up about 2/3rds of the tooth's total length.


Four different tissues make up each tooth. The enamel is the durable, white covering. Enamel protects the tooth from the wear and tear of chewing.


Dental Fact: did you know that the enamel on your teeth is the hardest substance in your body?


Dentin supports the enamel on your teeth. It's a yellow bone-like material that's softer than enamel and carries some of the nerve fibres that tell you when something is going wrong inside your tooth.


The Pulp is the centre of the tooth. It's a soft tissue that contains blood and lymph vessels, and nerves. The pulp is how the tooth receives nourishment and transmits signals to your brain.


Cementum is what covers most of the root of the tooth. It helps to attach the tooth to the bones in your jaw. A cushioning layer called the Periodontal Ligament sits between the cementum and the jawbone. It helps to connect the two.

Above article written by: HealthyTeeth.org

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Monday, 4 March 2013

Wisdom Teeth


Why Remove Wisdom Teeth?

Extraction of third molars can protect the overall health of the mouth. It is generally recommended when the following conditions occur:

Wisdom teeth only partially erupt. This leaves an opening for bacteria to enter around the tooth and cause an infection. Pain, swelling, jaw stiffness, and general illness can result.
Impacted wisdom teeth may continue growing without enough room, damaging adjacent teeth.

A fluid-filled sac (cyst) or tumor forms, destroying surrounding structures such as bone or tooth roots.

When to Remove Wisdom Teeth?

People between the ages of 16 and 19 should have their wisdom teeth evaluated. If they need to be removed, it should be considered before age 20 when generally fewer complications occur. At a younger age, tooth roots are not fully developed, the surrounding bone is softer, and there is less chance of damaging nearby nerves or other structures. There is also less surgical risk and healing is generally faster.


Extractions of wisdom teeth may be performed by a general dentist. If your dentist anticipates any special care will be needed, he or she may refer you to an oral or maxillofacial surgeon. An oral or maxillofacial surgeon is a dentist who specializes in surgery and the removal of wisdom teeth.

What to Expect?
Before surgery, your dentist will explain what to expect, have you sign a consent form and give you personalized instructions to follow. Keep in mind these general items in order to help your surgery go smoothly.

Wear loose, comfortable clothing and arrange to have someone be with you after surgery. Extraction can be performed under local conscious sedation or general anesthesia. Following surgery, you may experience some swelling and mild discomfort, which is part of the normal healing process. Cold compresses can help decrease the swelling and medication prescribed by your dentist can help decrease the pain. You may be instructed to drink only clear liquids following surgery and later progress to soft foods.

Some patients experience numbness or tingling following surgery. Normal sensation usually returns in a short period of time. Occasionally, a dry socket occurs when the blood clot breaks down earlier than normal. A dressing placed in the socket protects it until the socket heals.

Talk with your dentist about any questions that you have. It is especially important to let your dentist know, before surgery, of any illness that you have and medications that you are taking. If your general dentist has referred you to a specialist, they will both work together to provide you with the best and most efficient care. Keeping your teeth healthy – to a wise old age – is your dentist’s primary concern.
Above article written by: DentalHealthOnline.net


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Sunday, 3 March 2013

Learn more about mouth guards


Types of Mouth Guards

You don’t have to be a football player to benefit from wearing a mouth protector. Any adult or child involved in a recreational activity that poses a risk of injury to the mouth can obtain smile protection with this important safety device.

There are basically two types of mouth protectors:

Pre-fabricated:
A pre-fabricated mouth guard can be purchased at stores, these mouth guards are often only offered in a general size offerings.
Custom:
Mouth guards can also be fabricated by your dentist using an exact model (impression) of your mouth. This type of mouth guard provides superior fit and protection.

Custom-made mouth guards

Your dentist can create a special mouth protector just for you – one that will provide comfort and proper fit. A custom-made mouth protector is individually designed and constructed in the dental office or according to your dentist’s specifications in a professional dental laboratory.

First, the dentist makes an impression of the patient’s teeth. Using a special material, the dentist constructs the mouth protectors over a model of the teeth.

Although custom-made mouth protectors are somewhat more expensive than stock mouth protectors purchased in stores, their exceptionally good fit, comfort, and overall quality make them worth it. A custom-made mouth protector is easily retained in the mouth and does not interfere with speech or breathing. For these reason, custom-made devices are often preferred by sports enthusiasts and recommended by dentists. So give your smile a sporting chance – ask you dentist about mouth protectors.

Athletic Requirements

If you have dental appliances such as orthodontic braces or bridgework, you should wear a mouth protector that has been fitted by a dentist.
A mouth protector should be worn at all times during contact sports, in practice as well as during games.
Mishaps on the playing field, the basketball court, and while riding a bicycle or skateboard often involve blows to the head, face, and mouth.

Besides creating a painful emergency, injuries to the mouth can result in chipped or fractured teeth, nerve damage, and tooth loss. Wearing a mouth protector is a simple way to prevent many of these painful and costly injuries.

Above article written by: DentalHealthOnline.net

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Friday, 1 March 2013

Learn about dental sealants


What Sealants Do for You
A sealant is a clear shaded plastic material that is applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (premolars 
and molars), where decay occurs most often. This sealant acts as a barrier, protecting the decay prone areas of the tooth from plaque and acid.

How Sealants are Applied
Each tooth only takes a few minutes to seal. First, the teeth that will be sealed will be cleaned. The chewing surfaces are then etched (roughened) with a weak acidic solution to help the sealant adhere to the teeth. Finally, the sealant is placed onto the tooth enamel and hardened. Some sealants need a special curing light to help them harden, while others do not.


Who Should Have Sealants
Although children receive significant benefits from sealants, adults can also be at risk for pit and fissure decay and thus be candidates for sealants. Your dentist can advise you about the need for sealants. Sealants are also recommended even for those who receive topical applications of fluoride and who live in communities with 
fluoridated water. Fluoride helps fight decay on the smooth surfaces of the teeth but is least effective in pits and fissures.

How Long Do Sealants Last
When the sealant is applied, finger-like strands penetrate the pits and fissures of the tooth enamel. Although the sealant cannot be seen with the naked eye, the protective effect of these strands continues. As a result, it may be several years before another application of sealant is needed. Reapplication of the sealants will continue the protection against decay and may save the time and expense of having a tooth restored. Sealants will be checked during regular dental visits to determine if reapplication is necessary.

Above article written by: DentalHealthOnline.net

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048